Definitions - w

Warmenist

The online Urban Dictionary defines a warmenist as:

"Gullible, scientifically (sic) illiterate, unthinking acolyte and zombie-fired propagandist of the Religion of Anthropogenic Global Warming. One who takes direct orders from High Priest King of Idiocy, Albert J. Gore. One who puts the "mental" in environmentalism. Historical inheritors of those who believed that King Canute could hold back the tides and that the wolf would eat the moon unless their first-born daughter's virginity was sacrificed to the local shaman."

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Warmenista

From the online Urban Dictionary :

"Somebody who believes in and tries to convince others of the notion of global warming."

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Warmer Porn

From the online Urban Dictionary :

"Warmer Porn" is slang for disgusting or repulsive propaganda used by Warmers - fanatic believers in global warming - to try to get people to either fall for their belief set, or to intimidate them into silence. Often children are used in such portrayals as the victim of the adult world's excessive carbon emissions, in an effort to create guilt. Dead cities and landscapes, cities under water, people starving in third world countries, rabbits crying, dogs drowning, polar bears falling from the sky into the middle of cities are just a few of the examples of Warmer Porn.

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Washads

Washads refer to use of the cleaning of surfaces in a specific way to leave behind an advert by the shape of what was cleaned away. Often this is achieved by the use of a metal stencil 'punched' through as to leave the required advert when used with a power water cleaner.

Its is essential a form of 'green graffiti' or 'reverse graffiti'. The legality of the undertaking really depends on the laws in force in particular country and government district(s) concerned. Some do not specifically prevent it, whilst others classify any form of advertising as requiring explicit prior permission of the owner of the surface being so advertised upon. 

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Waste Reduction

This is a process to reduce or eliminate the amount of waste generated at its source or to reduce the amount of toxicity from waste or the reuse of materials. The best way to reduce waste is not to create it in the first place.

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Water Conservation

The protection, development, and efficient management of water resources for beneficial purposes. Often by a managed reduction in the usage of water.

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Water Footprint

A water footprint is an indicator of the amount of fresh water used by an organization, individual or product.

Modeled on the concept of carbon foot-printing, water footprints are measured in terms of the volume of water that is consumed over a given period of time.

As with carbon footprints they can either be used narrowly to calculate the amount of water used by an individual company or building, or extended to cover the amount of water used through the entire supply chain of an organization or lifetime of a product.

Some environmental groups are campaigning for water footprints to be reported by all businesses.

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Water Table

The level below the land surface at which the subsurface material is fully saturated with water. The depth of the water table reflects the minimum level to which wells must be drilled for water extraction.

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Water Tank

A water tank is a storage device for the safe storage of water. They can be made from concrete, plastic or steel and can be so engineered to store drinkable water for a long time safely. Water tanks are often a fixed installation either under or besides a property. In a home context they often used to harvest rain water from roofs for use either around the garden or to supply tap water. 

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Water-efficient Products

Those products that are in the upper 25% of water conservation for all similar products, or at least 10% more water-conserving than the minimum level that meets the Federal standards.

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Watershed

A scientist who studies organisms and their environment.

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Watt-hour

Watt-hour (WHr) is a measurement of power with respect to time. One watt-hour is equal to one watt being used for a period of one hour.

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Wave Power

The refers to using the periodic movement of the waves to generate power, usually in the form of electrical energy.

The wave energy can either be harvested out to sea using buoys or arrays of pontoons. Also if a coastline 'funnels' the waves in the right way, you can construct a wave dam to generate power by hydro.

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Weatherization

The process of reducing the leaks of heat from or into a building. It may involve caulking, weatherstripping, adding insulation, and other similar improvements to the building shell.

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Wet Deposits

Air pollutants that mix with moisture in the air before falling to the ground.

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Wind Farm

A group of wind generators that usually feeds power into the mains grid. Often sited where the winds are strongest and most consistent.

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Wind Power

This refers to using the wind to generate power, either directly in the form of mechanical energy (i.e. for pumping water) or via generators to produce electricity.

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Wind Turbine

A turbine having a large vaned wheel rotated by the wind to generate electricity. Often collected together to form 'farms'.

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WindCatcher

A windcatcher is a traditional Persian architectural device used for centuries to create natural ventilation and cooling in buildings.

See the wikipedia article for more detail.

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WMO

World Meteorological Organization, another UN organization, like the IPCC.

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Wood Energy

Wood and wood products used as fuel, including roundwood (i.e., cordwood), limbwood, wood chips, bark, sawdust, forest residues, and charcoal.

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Click on a letter to see all the terms and definitions that begin with that letter.

A free Android app containing all these definitions is now available, called the Green Dictionary. Click here to see the entry on the Android market; or click here if on an Android phone.